Swift Plantar Wart Treatment


Have you had a long standing plantar wart on your foot that just won’t go away? Have you tried a heap of different treatments with no success? If this sounds like you, be sure to read this blog to find out about an innovative treatment for plantar warts!

I know that plantar warts (or verruca as those from the Northern Hemisphere often call them) on the sole of your feet can be really painful. And they remind you that they are sore with every step that you take.

You have probably tried all sorts of different treatments too. From at home remedies where you are painting things on daily, or even had chemicals applied at the podiatrist or had it frozen at the doctors. But it just wont go away.

The problem with warts is that they are clever little viruses that are living in your skin. They manage to avoid upsetting the immune system, so the immune system doesn’t kick in and kick the wart out. So, you can end up stuck with it for long periods of time.

Here at Feetology, we have the latest technology in wart treatment, the Swift Microwave Generator. It is a new treatment that is designed to stimulate the immune system to help it clear the wart. It has been showing a high 83 % success rate and unlike other treatments, there are no needles, no messing around with ointments and bandages and no long, painful applications of freezing. There can be some short lived discomfort during treatment, but there is generally no pain or after care required between visits.
 

How does it work?

Swift uses microwaves to treat the wart. These microwaves heats up the skin and wart tissue to a very specific temperature that then stimulates the body’s natural immune response. The immune system then starts to fight the virus causing the wart.

Treatment with microwaves is safe, with the microwaves only penetrating to a predetermined depth with no spread into the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not about destroying the wart like cryotherapy (freezing) or the use of acids.


 

Is it painful?

A little discomfort is felt during treatment. But it is short lived. As mentioned above, we are heating the wart tissue for a short period of time. This can be uncomfortable, but as soon as treatment stops, the discomfort resolves. This differs from other destructive treatments that can leave painful blisters or sores after treatment.

 

How long does treatment take?

This will vary from person to person, but most people will resolve with 3 treatments spaced 4 weeks apart. Sometimes, more treatments are required for particularly stubborn warts.
 

Want to know more?

Grab our Ebook on this treatment. It outlines the process in greater detail, shows results that can be expected and compares it to other methods of treating plantar warts.
 
The New Way To Treat Plantar Warts

 

 

Click to get your free eBook on “Swift Plantar Wart Treatment”
 
 
 
 
 
 

Customising Archie Thongs

Did you know that we can modify your Archies Thongs to help your feet?

Why would we do this?

Archies thongs are great. They offer much more support than traditional thongs, but at times we need to customise them to suit you.

These modifications can help if you need a little more arch support, or if you have one leg longer than the other.

Watch the video above to see the process in action.

 

 

Are Your Shoes Worn Out – 3 Tests To Give Your Shoes A Thorough Check Up

Have you been spending your isolation time putting in more exercise? How do you know your runners are up to the job and not likely to cause you any feet problems?

Now, over the last few months, we’ve been seeing people getting out and exercising in record numbers around the Redlands. Our podiatrists see over 150 pairs of feet each week and the major contributing cause of foot pain is worn out shoes.

So how do you know if your shoes are worn and could possibly cause you any problems down the track?

Here are three quick tests you can do it home to check that your shoes are still up to the task.
 
 

1. The Lean Test

Put your shoes on a flat surface and look at them from behind. Is the heel unit is nice and square? We should not be seeing the heel counter leaning in, or leaning out. This is a sign that the shoes are worn and need replacing.
 
 

2. The Wobble Test

Again, place your shoes on a flat surface again. Start by lifting one edge of the shoe off the bench, and then let it go. We are looking for an extened period of rocking of the shoe. This is an indicator that the sole unit is worn. It is no longer a stable surface for you to walk or run on.
 
 

3. Too Many Toes Test

Is the upper of the shoe worn out? Are your toes poking out? Has there been damage to the lining of the shoe? Wear around the heel cup Area? If the answer is yes to any of these, your shoes need replacing. Damage can cause pressure and friction on your feet, and may lead to blisters, corns and callous.
 
 

So get out there and give your shoes a thorough check up. Your feet will thank you for it!!!

Colburn Ave Entry Closed Due To Roadworks

Driveway Upgrade – easier to enter and leave the shopping centre

The entry/exit to our little shopping centre is currently closed. The exciting news is they are fixing this entry/exit which was notorious for people dragging there tow bars (and somtimes catching the front end if not negotiated properly). However this will change access while they are doing the works.

How to enter from Colburn Ave

Entry to the practice is still easy, with access off Redland Bay Rd instead. Just continue pass the closed exit, turning left onto Redland Bay Rd, and take the first left into the car park (see map to to the bottom right).

No 1 Tip For Sore Feet

Are you having problems with your sore feet?

Podiatrist Mark Caldwell shares his No.1 thing to do if you are having foot problems. Watch the video above or read on to find out more if you have Sore Feet.

Now my number one tip if you’re starting to get a sore foot, is to look at what’s happening with your footwear. We want to make sure that we’re wearing something that’s nice and supportive on the foot. For example, we don’t want something loose, that’s flopping around on the foot and not helping. What we’re looking for is something with laces, so that it’s going to hold onto the midfoot well, but still have some room around the toes so we’re not squashing things. Or if laces aren’t your style, going for a velcro strap can be really useful as well.

Now, if that’s not enough to settle down your problem, then it’s time to get an expert advice. We have a team of podiatrists here at Feetology that can help to diagnose what’s going on for you, and develop the best treatment plan to get you on your feet as quickly as possible.

There’s no need to be putting up with sore feet. Get in touch with us here at the clinic on 3820 6326 or you can book online.
 
 
 
 
 

Back to School Shoe Buying Tips

GETTING IT RIGHT: WHY THE PERFECT SCHOOL SHOE IS IMPORTANT IN THE BACK TO SCHOOL RUSH

Wearing poor fitting school shoes can have a negative impact on your child’s health. Bones in children’s feet are still developing and are far more vulnerable to stresses when compared to adults. Ill-fitting shoes that are too tight, too big, too small, rub or cause injury to the feet, are likely to cause problems for bone growth and development, as well as for a child’s gait, posture and stability. While you’re getting your child prepared for the school year, don’t forget the importance of the shoes that will be carrying them around all day.

 

DOs

1. Ensure that shoes have ample adjustment and support in the form of buckles, shoelaces, or Velcro straps. Adequate fastenings will help to hold the shoe to the foot and allow the child to walk, run and play comfortably, without their shoes tripping them up.

2. Make sure that feet are properly measured when buying new school shoes. In most shoe stores, staff will be experienced and able to ensure that shoes fit properly in width and length. Different shoe manufactures use different sizes, so don’t assume that you know your child’s shoe size, have their feet measured properly in every shop you visit.

3. Buy shoes made from natural materials, as they’ll allow feet to breathe and reduce the build up of potentially harmful bacteria.

4. Soles should provide plenty of shock absorption to the balls of the feet and the heels to help soften the impact of running and jumping on delicate feet.

5. If your child’s feet are different lengths (this is quite common), always go up a size rather than down so as not to cramp the longer foot.

 

DON’Ts

1. Slip-on shoes are a big no-no. The muscles and tendons of the feet are potentially forced to work much harder to keep slip-ons, such as ballet flats, from falling off and it is also common to scrunch the toes to help keep the shoes on. This can lead to pain and serious deformities of the toes and arches, as well as long-term problems with overuse disorders, such as tendonitis.

2. Straggly edges, seams or stitching on the material inside the shoes can cause injury from constant rubbing and should be avoided. Check the inside of the shoe with your fingers to feel for any sharp or uneven edges and don’t buy shoes that aren’t smooth to touch as they will irritate your child’s feet and cause friction injuries such as blisters.

3. Don’t allow your child to wear fashion shoes such as canvas plimsolls to school everyday. While these shoes are great for occasional use, they don’t provide the support that growing feet need on a regular basis during physical activity.

4. While sports shoes are usually great in terms of support and comfort, they are also generally made to suit specific sports and aren’t intended for regular use. Save the sports shoes for sport instead of for all the time.

5. Don’t buy shoes that are too big as a way of allowing your child to grow into them throughout the year. Shoes that are too long will cause unnecessary rubbing and potential tripping hazards as the feet work harder to move comfortably in the shoes and hold them on.

6. Don’t buy shoes that are too small as they can squish the toes and prevent normal bone development.

 

Perfect fit guide to selecting new school shoes for your child

Shoe structure and design play a big part in the comfort, safety and health of your child’s feet, but if shoes don’t fit properly, damage will be caused no matter how well they have been made. Follow the steps below to ensure that new shoes fit your child properly for the school year.

1. Length: new shoes should be around a thumb’s width longer than your child’s longest toe. The foot slides forward inside the shoe when walking, and the thumb test is a good way to ensure that your child’s toes aren’t constantly contacting into the front of their shoes, which could cause injury.

2. Width: shoes should fit without constricting the sides of the feet or the toes. Little feet need room to move and shoes should have a wide and deep toe box to allow kids to wriggle their toes comfortably.

3. Height: heels should have a broad base and heel height should never be more than 4cm.

4. Ankle grip: the top of the shoe should fit around the ankle without rubbing.

5. Heel fit: the heel of the shoe should grip comfortably around the heel.

6. Comfort: your child should be able to walk and move naturally in the shoes without any changed behaviour or unusual walking patterns. Take time to allow this at the fitting.

 

If you have any trouble finding the right shoes for your child, visit our podiatrists so that they an help get you on the right track. Call us on 3820 6326 or you can book online.

 

 

Heal Your Heels – Tip 3 Stretch Your Calf Muscle

Calf Stretch Heel Pain

Do you wake up with pain under your heels in the morning? Are they sore after a long day of work? Heck! Your heels might be sore all of the time.

Heel pain is one of the most common problems that your feet are likely to suffer from. Our podiatrists help people like you improve their pain every day.

Today I am covering tip number 4 of 5 on things you can be doing to help ease your heel pain. Check out our blog to find more tips.

 

Tip 4 – Calf Stretch

So what does calf stretching have to do with heel pain? A lot. Tight calf muscles can leads to excess pressure on the heel and arch muscles, contributing to your pain. Doing some simple calf stretches can help to reduce the load. Keep reading to find out…

 

  • So how do I stretch this area?

It is really quite simple for you to stretch your calf. Stand about 50 cm from a wall or door. Place the leg not to be stretched forward and bend the front knee. Keep the back leg straight and lunge toward the wall (like in the photo above). Press your hips toward the wall to fill a stretch in your calf area.

 

  • How long do I hold the stretch?

Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, relax, and then repeat twice more.

 

  • When do I do this?

Doing this at least three times a day is key to making a change in the muscle.

 

So get in and start stretching our your calf muscles. Combining this with the other exercises and changes will start to improve you pain. Now as with any exercise, if you feel that it doesn’t feel right or is making the area sore, stop the exercise immediately. If this happens to you, it is time seek our help to diagnose the condition correctly and provide the right treatment plan.

Keep an eye out for next weeks blog which will be covering how to rest the area and the role orthotics can play.

If you missed last weeks on arch massage for heel pain, here it is.
 
 

Tips For Healing Your Heels – Arch Stretch

Heel Pain Arch Stretch

Do you wake up with pain under your heels in the morning? Are they sore after a long day of work? Heck! Your heels might be sore all of the time.

Heel pain is one of the most common problems that your feet are likely to suffer from. Our podiatrists help people like you improve their pain every day.

Today I am covering tip number 3 of 5 on things you can be doing to help ease your heel pain. Check out our blog to find more tips.

 

Tip 3 – Arch Stretch

Arch stretching before getting out of bed in the morning or after you have been sitting for some time can help to make your first few steps much more comfortable. Heel pain can be very painful after you have been resting for a while, until you start to move around and get the area warmed up. So how do you do this? Keep reading to find out…

 

  • So how do I stretch this area?

It is really quite simple for you to stretch your arch. Sitting on the edge of your bed, bring the sore foot up into your lap (like the picture above). Grab your toes, and pull your toes and foot toward your shin. This will give you a good stretch under your arch.

 

  • How long do I hold the stretch?

Hold the stretch for 20 seconds, relax, and then repeat twice more.

 

  • When do I do this?

Every morning before getting out of bed. Also it can be helpful after you have been sitting for a while. Do it after Tip 2 (arch massage) to get even better relief.

 

Starting your day by stretching out your arch should make getting out of bed easier for you in the mornings. Now, as with any exercise, if you feel that it doesn’t feel right or is making the area more sore, stop the exercise immediately. If this happens to you, it is time seek the assistance of a podiatrist to help you to diagnose the condition correctly and provide the right treatment plan.

Keep an eye out for next weeks blog which will be covering calf stretching. This is another exercise that can really help to take the load off the foot.

If you missed last weeks on arch massage for heel pain, here it is.
 
 

Tips For Healing Your Heels – Arch Massage

Plantar Fasciitis

Do you wake up with pain under your heels in the morning, or are they sore after a long day of work? Heck, they might just be sore all of the time.

Heel pain is one of the most common problems that your feet are likely to suffer from. Our podiatrist help people like you improve your pain every day. Today I am covering tip number 2 of 5 on things you can be doing to help ease your pain. Check out our blog to find more tips.

 

Tip 2 – Arch Massage

The muscles within the arch can be a big contributor to your pain. So getting in and massaging the muscles can be really beneficial. So how do you do this? Keep reading to find out.

  • How do I massage my arch?

Using a ball.

A ball the size of a golf ball works best for most people. It does not have to be as hard as a golf ball, in fact I have a lot of people using a child’s bouncy ball of that size. Something the size of a tennis ball is too large for most people and will not get into the smaller muscles of the arch.
 

  • How often?

Twice a day – morning and night. Doing this before getting walking in the morning can help to reduce some of the first step pain for a lot of people.

 

  • What do I do?

Start by sitting in a chair, place the ball on the ground and then rest your arch on top of your foot. Start to move your foot around on top of the ball. While you are rolling around, you are looking for any sore spots in the arch (not under the heel bone itself). If you don’t feel any at first, you may need to push a little harder.

Once you know where the sore spots are, pick the worst one and go to work on it. Do this by pressing on the area with the ball so that if feels like a good pain (a 3-4/10, it should not be making you pull faces). Now, the pain should begin to ease as you hold this, and once it is no longer improving (about 30 seconds), move onto the next most tender spot.

 

  • What happens if the area doesn’t improve or gets worse?

Stop working on that area. If it hasn’t started improving in the first 30 seconds, move on. Also, if the pain increases, reduce the pressure. If this does not help, move onto the next spot. Try it again when you next do your exercises. If the spot continues to be very painful after 2 days of trying, it is time for you to seek our professional opinion to confirm the diagnosis, as other conditions can mimic plantar fasciitis.

 

As you progress with this exercise over time, these sore spots should reduce and the exercise becomes quicker.

Now, stay tuned for next week’s blog which will cover how to stretch the plantar fascia and arch muscles. If you missed last weeks on footwear for heel pain, here it is.
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